Shockwave Therapy

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SHOCKWAVE THERAPY – (ESWT) AS A TREATMENT

Shockwave therapy is a multidisciplinary device used in orthopaedics, physiotherapy, sports medicine, urology and veterinary medicine. Its main assets are fast pain relief and mobility restoration. Together with being a non-surgical therapy with no need for painkillers makes it an ideal therapy to speed up recovery and cure various indications causing acute or chronic pain.

Acoustic waves with high energy peak used in Shockwave therapy interact with tissue causing overall medical effects of accelerated tissue repair and cell growth, analgesia and mobility restoration. All the processes mentioned in this section are typically employed simultaneously and are used to treat mainly sub-acute and chronic conditions.

Shock wave therapy is thought to work by inducing microtrauma to the tissue. This microtrauma initiates a healing response by the body. The healing response causes blood vessel formation and increased delivery of nutrients to the affected area. The microtrauma is thought to stimulate a repair process and relieve the symptoms of pain.

MEDICAL EFFECTS
New Blood Vessel Formation
Reversal of Chronic Inflammation
Stimulation of Collagen Production
Dissolution of Calcified Fibroblasts
Dispersion of Pain Mediator (pain relief)
Release of Trigger Points
Tissue Repair (healing)

TREATMENT INDICATIONS :
Chronic Tendinopathy
Tennis Elbow
Jumper’s Knee
Runner’s Knee
Achilles Tendinosis
Painful Shoulder (tendons or calcification)
Shin Splints
Heel Spurs
Plantar-Fasciitis
Hip Pain
Insertional Pain (hamstring origins and biceps insertions)

TREATMENT PROTOCOL :
2000 shocks are administered per session. This is a mechanical shockwave, not electrical. The treatment session of shockwave alone will take only 15 minutes to effect.
Normally 6-8 sessions suffice – depending on the injured area, and how long the condition has been there.
I was the first to bring this machine into the country 16 years ago and have had immense success using it.

Clinton Grobbelaar
(Physiotherapist)